Examine the tense relationship and enmity between the US, the Soviet Union and China. Part I covers the period from 1945 and the Potsdam Conference to Nixon’s historic trip to China in 1972. Topics include Stalin’s tyranny, the Berlin Wall, postwar Soviet expansionism, the Bay of Pigs and the Cuban Missile crisis. During World War II, the United States and the Soviet Union fought together as allies against the Axis powers; however, the relationship between the two nations was a tense one. Americans had long been wary of Soviet communism and concerned about Russian leader Joseph Stalin’s tyrannical, blood-thirsty rule of his own country. For their part, the Soviets resented the Americans’ decades-long refusal to treat the USSR as a legitimate part of the international community as well as their delayed entry into World War II, which resulted in the deaths of tens of millions of Russians. After the war ended, these grievances ripened into an overwhelming sense of mutual distrust and enmity. Postwar Soviet expansionism in Eastern Europe fueled many Americans’ fears of a Russian plan to control the world. Meanwhile, the USSR came to resent what they perceived as American officials’ bellicose rhetoric, arms buildup and interventionist approach to international relations. In such a hostile atmosphere, no single party was entirely to blame for the Cold War; in fact, some historians believe it was inevitable.

Important Note:

Class meets at our main campus.